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common Wood Cuts

Common Cuts

Grain pattern and consistency is determined by the type of veneer cut.

Plain Sliced

Plain Sliced — or Flat Cut — veneers are the result of sawing a log parallel to the center or cut line.

  • Leaf widths vary based on log size and location of center cut
  • Offers greater consistency and straight grain patterns
  • One of the most preferred cuts for architectural doors

Rotary Cut

Rotary Cut veneers are the result of turning a blade in a
continuous roll against a log mounted on a lathe.

  • Produces a variety of patterns and wide sheets
  • Blade slices through the path of the growth rings
  • Grain pattern is naturally inconsistent making the
    leaves difficult to match

Quarter Cut

Quarter Cut veneers are the result of slicing flat through
a quartered log.

• Produces a narrow striped pattern
• Blade slices at a right angle against the growth rings
• Tight vertical grain eliminates arches and cathedral patterns found in Plain Sliced veneer
• This cutting method produces a visual characteristic commonly known as flake. The flake may appear rough and is not considered a defect.

Rift Cut

Rift Cut veneers are the result of slicing a quartered log
against the growth rings.

  • Only available in oak species
  • Reduces the “flake” effect
  • Produces a narrow striped pattern similar to Quarter Cut